Import the project into Vercel using your Git of choice: After your project has been imported, all subsequent pushes to branches will generate Preview Deployments, and all changes made to the Production Branch (commonly "main") will result in a Production Deployment. In this guide, we will walk you through creating and deploying a Next.js app with the most popular open source database in the world, MySQL, on Vercel. with Next.js API routes. This is as easy as creating a file within the pages/api folder called graphql.js. To use this guide, you will need to setup a remote MySQL database. 5 min read In this article, we were able to create a GraphQL server with CORS support, loading data from Postgres, and stomping out N+1 performance issues using DataLoader. Make a new file named .env.local with contents copied from .env.local.example. This is why the artist doesn’t have a name resolver, for example. If you got an error, please double check your credentials. The result of the resolver functions must line up with the types defined above. Next.js is no longer just for the frontend (as you can see). Many cloud providers offer this service, such as Digital Ocean, Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud. This SQL query gets run for each album, meaning that if you have fifty albums to display, you will have to perform fifty additional SQL queries to load each album’s artist. Starting up the Next.js development server. A solution to see exactly what a user did to trigger an error, Proactive monitoring which automatically surfaces issues, Having a support team triage issues more efficiently, Virtual scrolling: Core principles and basic implementation in React, Creating a Google Keep clone with React and Firebase, Using React Native to implement a carousel, Defining type definitions which describe the GraphQL schema, Creating resolvers: The ability to generate a response to a query or mutation, Creating a handler that will tie things into the Next.js API request and response lifecycle, arguments: In the first example which included, context: Context is global state, such as who the authenticated user is, or in our case, the global instance of DataLoader. Thanks! Just joking… if only it were that easy! Let’s remove our hello query and resolvers, replacing them with definitions for loading albums and artists from the database: You’ll have noticed that I didn’t define every single field for the Album and Artist resolvers. Create a new Next.js project using the with-mysql template and enter the newly created directory: Creating a new Next.js project from with-mysql template and entering /next-mysql directory. That said, we’re going to set things up ourselves, focusing on a number of additional concepts, so I have chosen to go with the bare-bones starter app. At the end of this example, we want to be able to perform the following query of albums and artists, loaded efficiently from our Postgres database: Setting up a GraphQL server involves four steps: After importing the gql function from apollo-server-micro (and having installed yarn add apollo-server-micro), we can define our type definitions, describing the schema of our GraphQL server. Next.js from Vercel is a production-ready framework that can help you create fast React apps. The purpose of a loader is to pool up IDs (of artists in our case) to load and load them all at once in a single batch, rather than each one on its own: We need to pass our loader to our GraphQL resolvers, which can be done via context: This allows us to update our album resolver to utilize the DataLoader: The end result is a single query to the database to load all the artists at once… N+1 problem solved! The easiest way to set up Next.js is to run the command npx create-next-app.If you don’t have npx installed, it can first be installed by running npm i -g npx to install it globally on your system.. By using it along with MySQL, you can create a fast, modern web app that interacts with customer data in a performant manner. There is a hidden problem with the above resolvers… specifically, loading the artist for each album. New video about Next.js API Routes using SQL Database This is a good starting point for beginners! In this article, we will learn how to use API routes to set up a GraphQL API within a Next.js app. Hard-coding data can get boring… it’s time to load it from the database! Do you spend a lot of time reproducing errors in your apps? The project template gives you a fully complete CRUD application Which, if any, do you think would help you reproduce errors more effectively? Many people only think of Next.js as a frontend React framework, providing server-side rendering, built-in routing, and a number of performance features. To deploy your Next.js + MySQL app with a Vercel for Git, make sure it has been pushed to a Git repository. Which of these topics are you most interested in? Not bad for a day’s work! To be honest we could remove the id resolver as well! In your .env.local file, fill in the values for your MySQL credentials that you made note of when creating your instance. In this setup, an ENV variable is required in order to know how to connect to the database. Create a knexfile.js file, configuring Knex so it knows how to talk to our database. You should see a success message if the migration ran successfully. LogRocket is like a DVR for web apps, recording literally everything that happens on your site. Interested to hear how LogRocket can improve your bug fixing processes? If you are using Now along with Next.js, I have an article which talks about setting up secrets. An example of what your file should look like after providing the values is shown below: Then, you can run the migration script to create the entries table according to the following schema: Copying contents from .env.example into a new file named.env.local. All of this is still true, but since version 9, Next.js also supports API routes, an easy way to provide a backend to your React frontend code, all within the same package and setup. There is even an example setup you can use for the very thing we are going to cover today, setting up Next.js with a GraphQL API: npx create-next-app --example api-routes-graphql. It has first-class support for server endpoints and the perfect place to put your GraphQL API. With our schema defined, we need to write the code that will enable our server to respond to queries and mutations. We demonstrate the set up via an example app, that let's you create, read, update, and delete journal entries. February 10, 2020 The above code will simply respond with the text “GraphQL!”, but with this setup we could respond with any JSON that we wanted, reading query params, headers, etc… from the req (request) object. In this guide, we will walk you through creating and deploying a Next.js app with the most popular open source database in the world, MySQL, on Vercel.. Next.js from Vercel is a production-ready framework that can help you create fast React apps. Setting up Next.js. If you don’t have npx installed, it can first be installed by running npm i -g npx to install it globally on your system. The migration for artists looks like this: And the migration for albums looks like this: With our tables in place, I ran the following insert statements in Postico to set up a few dummy records: The last step before updating our GraphQL API to load data from the database is to create a connection to our DB within the graphql.js file. If you want to follow along, there's no need to install … Eventually, we’ll expand on this, but for now, we have a field we can query called hello that responds with a String. The arguments each resolver function receive are: Passing the typeDefs and resolvers to a new instance of ApolloServer gets us up and running: From the apolloServer we can access a handler, in charge of handling the request and response lifecycle. With Next.js setup, we’re going to add an API (server) route to our app. The easiest way to set up Next.js is to run the command npx create-next-app. 1665. These are called resolvers, and each field (such as hello) requires a function that will produce some result. Deploy your Next.js and MySQL app with Vercel in a serverless environment. By using it along with MySQL, you can create a fast, modern web app that interacts with customer data in a performant manner. It will start with the basic setup, and then cover some more in-depth concepts such as CORS, loading data from Postgres via the Knex package, improving performance using the DataLoader package and pattern, and avoiding costly N+1 queries. There is even an example setup you can use for the very thing we are going to cover today, setting up Next.js with a GraphQL API: npx create-next-app --example api-routes-graphql. First, install the required packages: yarn add knex pg. Marc-André Giroux has a great article on this problem, and we’re going to discover how to solve it right now! My local ENV variable looks like PG_CONNECTION_STRING="postgres://leighhalliday@localhost:5432/next-graphql": Next, we are able to create database migrations to set up our artists and albums tables. Instead of guessing why problems happen, you can aggregate and report on problematic GraphQL requests to quickly understand the root cause. There is an additional config we need to export, stopping the body of incoming HTTP requests from being parsed, a requirement for GraphQL to work correctly: If we would like to enable or limit cross-origin requests using CORS, we’re able to add the micro-cors package to enable this: In this case, I have limited the cross-origin HTTP methods to POST and OPTIONS, changing the default export to have our handler passed to the cors function. Most of them offer a free trial. Copying contents from .env.local.example into a new file named.env.local. Once you have your remote MySQL database setup, you should make a note of your database credentials: When you scaffolded the with-mysql Next.js example, your project came with a .env.local.example file. Leave your email: Leigh Halliday is a developer based out of Canada who works at FlipGive (https://www.flipgive.com). The first step is to define a loader. He writes about React and Ruby on his blog (https://www.leighhalliday.com) and publishes React tutorials on YouTube (https://youtube.com/leighhalliday). In addition, you can track Apollo client state and inspect GraphQL queries' key-value pairs. Empty migration files are created with the command yarn run knex migrate:make create_artists (and a similar one for albums). There’s a tiny bit of setup to get this up and running. For now, its contents will be: Done! The next step might involve adding mutations along with some authentication to our app, enabling users to create and modify data with the correct permissions. If it is going to simply read an attribute from an object, you can avoid defining the resolver for that field. With everything wired up, you can start a local development server and interact with your database. The finished app can be found at https://next-mysql.vercel.app.